PhD Pharma Whey HT+ Review

Pharma Whey HT+ is a powder based supplement from UK based manufacturer PhD Supplements. The manufacturers claim that this supplement can aid lean muscle growth and maintenance. This review will look at the ingredients within Pharma Whey HT+ to understand whether it can achieve these claims, and how effective it can be at doing so.

Ingredients

Whey  / Wheat Protein Concentrate and Isolate

Whey protein helps aid muscle protein synthesis when combined with resistance training (1, 2). Other key features include increasing muscle mass (3), an increase in lean body mass (4) and greater recovery from exercise (5). Longer periods of supplementation have shown greater gains in fat free mass (6).

Muscle protein synthesis is increased due to high concentration of Leucine (BCAA) which is a signalling molecule needed to increase muscle protein synthesis (7). Consumption of whey protein helps increase muscle mass due to a greater amount of peripheral nitrogen retention whereas soy protein has been found to have a greater effect on splanchnic protein synthesis (8).

The reason for greater recovery of exercise can be due to a post exercise insulin response (9, 10) which means glycogen resynthesis occurs rapidly so exercise can be prolonged, with greater training volume increased hypertrophy and decreased muscle damage.

Reduced Fat Cocoa Powder

Cocoa powder has been found to include flavonoids which are antioxidants, they can aid in the oxidation of LDL, (11,12) and augments the antioxidant defence system (13). Cocoa powder has also been found to stimulate nitric oxide production which can reduce oxidative stress and reduce the risk of heart attack (14).

L-Glutamine

Glutamine is a naturally non-essential neutral amino acid that helps with the transport of nitrogen between tissues. Heavy exercise has shown a reduction of glutamine in the blood (15). The amount of glutamine in the muscle is known to be related to the rate of protein synthesis (16) and glycogen synthesis (17) in the first few hours of recovery period of exercise.

L-Leucine / L-Isoleucine / L-Valine

Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine are all Branched chain amino acids (BCAA’s). They are essential for protein synthesis which is stimulated after exhaustive exercise (18) as well as the critical metabolic process in muscle (19,20). The metabolic roles of Leucine include energy production and the modulator of muscle protein synthesis via the insulin signalling pathway. There is a reason to suggest that it helps maintenance of muscle mass during weight loss (21). Leucine has also been shown to help in the direct maintenance of glucose homeostasis by improving the redistribution of glucose via the glucose – alanine cycle (22).

Amylase

Amylase is an enzyme that breaks down starch into simple sugars which are absorbed into the bloodstream quickly. This enzyme is produced naturally in the pancreas and released into the small intestine it is also found in the saliva. It has been found that amylase can contribute to the reduction of swelling (23), however more research is needed to elucidate this.

Cellulase

Cellulase is an enzyme that helps in the breakdown of cellulose and turns it into beta glucose. Glucose is vital for the maintaining energy levels, however simple sugars can cause an insulin spike which mean a quick energy release followed by a quick energy crash and any left over sugar is turned into fat. The beta glucose from cellulose is a slow release of energy which is provided for longer. Other key benefits of cellulase is that it reduces cholesterol and supports cell membranes in the fight against free radicals which improves immune response.

Lipase

Lipase is an enzyme that helps breakdown fats that are absorbed in the small intestine. Fat that doesn’t get fully digested can cover food and disrupt the breakdown of carbohydrates and proteins. Lipase is vital as it turns fat into a more soluble form, fatty acids and glycerol. Lipase can be found in the stomach, pancreas and mouth. It can help in the control of cholesterol and triglycerides (24).

Protease

Protease is an enzyme that aids in the breakdown of protein (25), a process known as hydrolyze. It is involved in bonding amino acids together. Protease helps aid inflammatory conditions and immune regulation (26).

Tilactase

Tilactase is also known as Lactase. Lactase is an enzyme that is involved in the breakdown of lactose. This enzyme is produced naturally in the small intestine and is lacking in people who are lactose intolerant (27). The main reason for using this enzyme is for people who are lactose intolerant which experience cramps, bloatedness and diarrhea.

Xanthan Gum

Xanthan Gum are water soluble dietary fibres, which have been reported to reduce total cholesterol; however there seems to be insufficient evidence to confirm this theory. (28)

Guar Gum

Guar gum is a dietary fibre that has been reported to decrease plasma cholesterol concentration (29) and increased satiety (30). However a meta-analysis found that although this product is safe no benefit has been found compared to a placebo (31).

Sucralose

Sucralose is a sweetener that is calorie free. This ingredient is used in many products and is used to make the product taste sweeter and does not have any nutritional benefit.

Soya Lecithin

SOYA Lecithin is an emulsifier which means that it helps aid the ingredients to disperse in water rather than separate into oily droplets and water.

Summary

PhD Pharma Whey HT+ can achieve the claims that it sets out which includes helping aid lean muscle growth and maintenance. This product can also help with controlling cholesterol levels and the breakdown of protein, lactose and fats. This supplement is recommended to be taken pre and post-exercise. This product has no banned substances when referring to the WADA prohibited list when observing the label/ ingredients posted on the website.

*NOTE – This product has not been tested in a laboratory and may contain other substances that may not appear on the label

References

1 – Coker, R. H., Miller, S., Schutzler, S., Deutz, N., & Wolfe, R. R. (2012). Whey protein and essential amino acids promote the reduction of adipose tissue and increased muscle protein synthesis during caloric restriction-induced weight loss in elderly, obese individuals. Nutr J, 11(1), 105.

2 – Hulmi, J. J., Lockwood, C. M., & Stout, J. R. (2010). Review Effect of protein/essential amino acids and resistance training on skeletal muscle hypertrophy: A case for whey protein.

3 – Pasiakos, S. M., McLellan, T. M., & Lieberman, H. R. (2015). The effects of protein supplements on muscle mass, strength, and aerobic and anaerobic power in healthy adults: a systematic review. Sports Medicine, 45(1), 111-131.

4 – Volek, J. S., Volk, B. M., Gómez, A. L., Kunces, L. J., Kupchak, B. R., Freidenreich, D. J., … & Kraemer, W. J. (2013). Whey protein supplementation during resistance training augments lean body mass. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 32(2), 122-135.

5 – Hansen, M., Bangsbo, J., Jensen, J., Bibby, B. M., & Madsen, K. (2014). Effect of Whey Protein Hydrolysate on Performance and Recovery of Top-Class Orienteering Runners. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism.

6 – Hartman, J. W., Tang, J. E., Wilkinson, S. B., Tarnopolsky, M. A., Lawrence, R. L., Fullerton, A. V., & Phillips, S. M. (2007). Consumption of fat-free fluid milk after resistance exercise promotes greater lean mass accretion than does consumption of soy or carbohydrate in young, novice, male weightlifters. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 86(2), 373-381.

7- Atherton, P. J., Smith, K., Etheridge, T., Rankin, D., & Rennie, M. J. (2010). Distinct anabolic signalling responses to amino acids in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. Amino acids, 38(5), 1533-1539.

8 – Fouillet, H., Mariotti, F., Gaudichon, C., Bos, C., & Tomé, D. (2002). Peripheral and splanchnic metabolism of dietary nitrogen are differently affected by the protein source in humans as assessed by compartmental modeling. The Journal of nutrition, 132(1), 125-133.

9- Hulmi, J. J., Volek, J. S., Selänne, H. A. R. R. I., & Mero, A. A. (2005). Protein ingestion prior to strength exercise affects blood hormones and metabolism. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 37(11), 1990-1997.

10 – Power, O., Hallihan, A., & Jakeman, P. (2009). Human insulinotropic response to oral ingestion of native and hydrolysed whey protein. Amino acids, 37(2), 333-339.

11 – Bearden MM, Pearson DA, Rein D, et al. Potential cardiovascular health benefits of procyanidins present in chocolate and cocoa. In: Parliment TH, Ho C-T, Schieberle P, eds. Caffeinated beverages: health benefits, physiological effects, and chemistry. Washington, DC: American Chemical Society, 2000:177–186
12 – Pearson DA, Schmitz HH, Lazarus SA, Keen CL. Inhibition of in vitro low-density lipoprotein oxidation by oligomeric procyanidins present in chocolate and cocoas. In: Packer L, ed. Methods in enzymology. Vol. 335. New York: Academic Press, 2001:350–60.
13 – Keen, C. L., Holt, R. R., Oteiza, P. I., Fraga, C. G., & Schmitz, H. H. (2005). Cocoa antioxidants and cardiovascular health. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 81(1), 298S-303S.
14 – Osakabe N, Sanbongi C, Yamagishi M, Takizawa T, Osawa T. Effects of polyphenol substances derived from Theobroma cacao on gastric mucosal lesion induced by ethanol. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1998;62:1535–8.
15 – Parry-Billings, M., Budgett, R., Koutedakis, Y., Blomstrand, E., Brooks, S.., Williams, C.,  & Newsholme, E. A. (1992). Plasma amino acid concentrations in the overtraining syndrome: possible effects on the immune system. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 24(12), 1353-1358.

16 – Rennie, M. J., Edwards, R. H. T., Krywawych, S., Davies, C. T., Halliday, D., Waterlow, J. C., & Millward, D. J. (1981). Effect of exercise on protein turnover in man. Clin Sci, 61(5), 627-639.

17 – Bowtell, J. L., Gelly, K., Jackman, M. L., Patel, A., Simeoni, M., & Rennie, M. J. (1999). Effect of oral glutamine on whole body carbohydrate storage during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 86(6), 1770-1777.

18 – Coker, R. H., Miller, S., Schutzler, S., Deutz, N., & Wolfe, R. R. (2012). Whey protein and essential amino acids promote the reduction of adipose tissue and increased muscle protein synthesis during caloric restriction-induced weight loss in elderly, obese individuals. Nutr J, 11(1), 105.

19 – Hulmi, J. J., Lockwood, C. M., & Stout, J. R. (2010). Review Effect of protein/essential amino acids and resistance training on skeletal muscle hypertrophy: A case for whey protein.

20 – Pasiakos, S. M., McLellan, T. M., & Lieberman, H. R. (2015). The effects of protein supplements on muscle mass, strength, and aerobic and anaerobic power in healthy adults: a systematic review. Sports Medicine, 45(1), 111-131.

21 – Volek, J. S., Volk, B. M., Gómez, A. L., Kunces, L. J., Kupchak, B. R., Freidenreich, D. J., … & Kraemer, W. J. (2013). Whey protein supplementation during resistance training augments lean body mass. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 32(2), 122-135.

22 – Hansen, M., Bangsbo, J., Jensen, J., Bibby, B. M., & Madsen, K. (2014). Effect of Whey Protein Hydrolysate on Performance and Recovery of Top-Class Orienteering Runners. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism.

23 – Akhtar, N. M., Naseer, R., Farooqi, A. Z., Aziz, W., & Nazir, M. (2004). Oral enzyme combination versus diclofenac in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee–a double-blind prospective randomized study. Clinical rheumatology,23(5), 410-415.`

24 – Applebaum-Bowden, D. (1995). Lipases and lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase in the control of lipoprotein metabolism. Current opinion in lipidology, 6(3), 130-135.

25 – Battifora, H., & Kopinski, M. (1986). The influence of protease digestion and duration of fixation on the immunostaining of keratins. A comparison of formalin and ethanol fixation. Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry, 34(8), 1095-1100.

26 – Reed, C. E., & Kita, H. (2004). The role of protease activation of inflammation in allergic respiratory diseases. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology,114(5), 997-1008.

27 – Manzoni, P., Mostert, M., Leonessa, M. L., Priolo, C., Farina, D., Monetti, C., … & Gomirato, G. (2006). Oral supplementation with Lactobacillus casei subspecies rhamnosus prevents enteric colonization by Candida species in preterm neonates: a randomized study. Clinical infectious diseases, 42(12), 1735-1742.

28 – Jensen, C. D., Spiller, G. A., Gates, J. E., Miller, A. F., & Whittam, J. H. (1993). The effect of acacia gum and a water-soluble dietary fiber mixture on blood lipids in humans. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 12(2), 147-154.

29 – Superko, H. R., Haskell, W. L., Sawrey-Kubicek, L., & Farquhar, J. W. (1988). Effects of solid and liquid guar gum on plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in moderate hypercholesterolemia. The American journal of cardiology, 62(1), 51-55.

30 – Bent, S., Tiedt, T. N., Odden, M. C., & Shlipak, M. G. (2003). The relative safety of ephedra compared with other herbal products. Annals of Internal Medicine, 138(6), 468-471.

31 – Pittler, M. H., & Ernst, E. (2001). Guar gum for body weight reduction: meta-analysis of randomized trials. The American journal of medicine, 110(9), 724-730.

phd pharma whey ht review
Use for  Muscle Gain
Website  phd-supplements.com
Price  £29.99 – £59.99